Monday, December 27, 2010

A fine line of massing

5"x7" oil
This one was painted more gesturally. Total unfocus of eyes and look more at subject than canvas. This way light becomes the subject. I prefer this one. Of course I should do every painting this way but outside forces occassionally come into play.

This one was more drawn. Why? good question. I know better but it still happens. I think drawing skills are critical to learn. Painting is painting...not drawing. A good base of all skills will help immensely but one must decide ....draw or paint?

10 comments:

SamArtDog said...

The very best ones always paint themselves. You (I, he, she, it) can draw or you can stay out of your own way. Pick one.

brian eppley said...

This is the dilema. To paint ones self unconsciously while ignoring ones self consciously. At the risk of psyco babble you raise a good point. I collapse into bed..........

Jala Pfaff said...

So cool to see both of these to compare. I agree.

LOVE what you did with your blog header!!

P.S. I notice whenever I come here, Sam has beat me to it.

brian eppley said...

Thanks Jala. Yeah, Sam hits quick. Hope you feel better.

loriann said...

Hi Brian,
Strong drawing skills are the underlying skeleton to a beautiful painting...even if it doesn't show. Take Wolf Kahn. He had exceptional drawing abilities and felt they were strength to his work. Yes, he is known for color, but without the ability to draw he stated that a painter was sunk. WK would actually give examples of those who couldn't draw and that's why they branched away from any "realism.".
On another note I like the new header as well. You are always stretching and finding new ways to push yourself. I see a fruitful 2011 in your future! Cheers!

brian eppley said...

Good to see you're home Loriann and no need to shovel! Yes, I agree good drawing skills are integral. The deeper I go I find massing more relevant. Line can go so far...mass can rule. The ability for the eye hand relationship to develope(drawing)is very important. The early charcoal sketches are proving relevant.Massing. I can't speak for Wolf. My latest interest in gesture has led me on this path. Organizing shapes in a direction is interesting

Brian McGurgan said...

Yep, the difference is striking Brian. The gestural one is beautifully suggestive and expressive. I love your new banner, too.

brian eppley said...

Thanks Brian M. I'm coming to some realizations lately. With any luck, maybe some good stuff will appear. Guess you're buried in snow? just missed us.

loriann said...

Hi Brian, I do agree with you about massing, so important and you show that so well. yet if the underlying eloquence of the drawing is not solid the massing is just shape. Wolf's work is about beautiful massing, yet the man can draw... especially obvious in his barns. Maybe it's just the know and understanding the line, not necessarily putting it there that makes it stronger. What do you think?

brian eppley said...

Hi Loriann. In an attempt to give a more clear idea of what I mean I'll say this. Drawing is a crucial skill and it's clear in a body of work who can or can't draw. When I talk of painting relative to drawing, what I mean is I want the paint to "become" the "subject". In other words the application process must be one that allows accidents or forms to appear through direct will and focus. Concentrating on the idea of what one wants to appear on the canvas. Drawing with charcoal or any other "loose" medium works. Again the idea being let the shapes find themselves. When I say paint don't draw, I'm projecting my own thoughts about the application process. Not trying to condemn drawing by any means. I like how Van goghs directional mark making was the same whether drawing or painting. To clarify my take, instead of saying "paint don't draw"... perhaps I should say "don't draw a tree...let the paint become the trees". When I post right after painting, I'm still in a strange mindset where I say things that make little sense:)