Monday, August 10, 2009

City Island Marina



30"x40" plein air




Back in studio I break out the brushes... Do some edge work.... More boat markings..... By applying so much paint on site I was able to keep the same atmosphere back in the studio. Just had to push a little paint here and there. The energy that goes into these big plein air pieces is hard to describe. I felt like I was back racing mountain bikes!












As I slowly make markings for the boats, the thunder is getting closer. Since I'm on top of a building.... on the river.....With a storm approaching... Probably wise to pack up... So I do...The sky lets loose just as I cross the river in my car.... Close call....
















Mixed some more values......Decided to include the foreground tree...tweaked the buildings... Pondered just exactly how to tackle the boats.... Way too busy to attempt detail.... I decided to just use markings and forget about the fact that they are boats....Thunder gets my attention...















Brought out my studio palette, cans of paint included. Going big... using lots of paint....mixed my darks and knifed them in....


















Yikes, That's alot of canvas. 30"x 40" to be exact. Saturday morning....on top of the parking garage...on city island....in Harrisburg, PA.... I decide to tackle a big plein air piece. I checked weather radar.....Storms were in State College...

2 comments:

loriann said...

WOW Brian, 30x40 in plein air!!!! ...I am in awe! You are simply amazing! It is hard enough for me to do that in the studio. What did you find to be the biggest challenges?, not including the crazy weather, of course! Will you go back to finish? Looks like a good start already.

brian eppley said...

Hi Loriann. Not amazing...just a bit crazy. I've been admiring the old California plein air painters lately and there huge work so decided to dive in. It is liberating.

The challenges are many. This particular day was actually easy. Light condition was pretty consistent. No wind. I could park my car right at the spot. Add a nice cement "thing" to put my huge studio palette on and whammo we're in business. As you can see I set my easel up left of the subject although I am right handed. I always cross myself. Not smart but that's what I do. The bigger canvasses start to impede the view of the subject. I deal with it and maybe will break the habit someday. My biggest issue once setup... mixing huge volumes of paint. I still apply with the knife and want thick paint. There's no thin wash layer for me. I cover with thick paint.

The issues are where to put an umbrella...will it even cover the canvas let alone palette?...what to set the palette on?...is my vehicle capable of holding the equipment?...How much weight do I need if it's windy?...
All these things I find intriguing. It forces us to be even more creative and spontaneous to produce work out of the comfort zone.
As far as the finishing process... I may never touch this one again. I was going for atmosphere. That's why I chose a ridiculously busy scene. A cityscape with a harbor full of pontoon boats. Someone could easily spend a month on it. But thats not how I paint. The piece seems to have a life and I don't want to kill it.

Off to see your new stuff!